A Very Retro Christmas

BOSTON (WBZ-AM) -- As the Christmas gifts get opened, Jon Keller sees an effort to cope with a modern-day parenting dilemma in the choices many shoppers made this year.

Merry Christmas to all, hope you’re enjoying the day so far. 

I hope Santa was good to your household, and I found it interesting to read that some of the most popular toys Santa has been asked for this year have been throwbacks to an earlier time.

According to CBS News, “nostalgia is fueling demand for many of the season's hottest toys and games including Tickle Me Elmo, Cupcake Surprise Dolls, Rugrats and Super Nintendo Entertainment System: Super NES Classic Edition.” 

Also a hot item this year: Teddy Ruxpin, the story-telling bear who used to require cassette tapes but now works off an app.

 There’s been quite the advertising push behind some of these retro toys, so I’m sure quite a few kids are asking for them. 

But for the most part this seems like the result of parents, surveying the modern-day landscape of ultra high-tech gadgets sometimes promoting inappropriate topics and habits for the kids who get their hands on them too young, deciding that a return to a gentler, more low-tech era is a good idea.

I’m sure this is fine with Santa – less costly retrofitting of his North Pole workshop and retraining of the elves necessary.

But it also speaks to a key parenting issue that just keeps getting more intense – how do you keep your kids from having their childhood swallowed up by the all-consuming hypnosis of the smartphone?

One solution – make ‘em wait. 

High school, if they keep their grades up, seems fair enough. 

And in the meantime, you can share a lot of laughs and secrets with Tickle Me Elmo and he will never betray your confidence.

You can listen to Keller At Large on WBZ News Radio every weekday at 7:55 a.m. Listen to his previous podcasts on iHeartRadio. 

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Keller @ Large

Keller @ Large

Jon Keller is a WBZ TV & Radio political analyst. Read more

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