Sour Grapes Over 'Sweet Caroline'

neil diamond boston red sox

Neil Diamond sings Sweet Caroline at Fenway Park in 2013. (Jim Rogash/Getty Images)

BOSTON (WBZ-AM) -- As I hope you already know, we love listener feedback.

And since relatively few people ever take the time to let us know what they think of what we’re doing, every email or voice message receives special attention.

I personally read every email that comes my way, unless the subject line or opening sentence contains profanity or something offensive, like “you are obviously not an American.”

So, I sound French to you?

Criticism that is not undermined this way is taken seriously and carefully considered.

But not stuff like the email about what I thought was a harmless TV commentary calling for the Red Sox to continue playing the Neil Diamond song “Sweet Caroline” in spite of efforts to get rid of it.

This was an example of how not to make a political point.

It begins: “You don't get it and you insult all descent [sic] people with your nonsense. There are some people sick and tired of paying homage to the Kennedy Family… of serious criminals and abusers of women.”

This is an apparent reference to Neil Diamond’s 2007 claim that song was inspired by a photo of President John F. Kennedy’s daughter Caroline. A little research would have revealed that in 2014 Diamond said the song was actually about his wife.

The email continues: “There should be a movement to have the Kennedy name removed from all public buildings, and not the people you chose to pick on.”

This must be a reference to the removal of the Yawkey name from outside Fenway Park, a move I opposed, not supported.

Facts wrong, ad hominem attacks.

Pro tip: don’t do this if you want to connect.

It’s the sort of thing the delete key was made for.

You can listen to Keller At Large on WBZ News Radio every weekday at 7:55 a.m. Listen to his previous podcasts on iHeartRadio. 

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Keller @ Large

Keller @ Large

Jon Keller is a WBZ TV & Radio political analyst. Read more

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