Leave Baseball Alone

Baseball and Glove (Credit: Getty Images)

BOSTON, MA (WBZ-AM) -- Here we go again with the whiners and moaners who want to rebrand baseball as a more competitive, faster-paced game – essentially, rebrand it from the creaky old national pastime that has entertained us for the past 179 years to something hipper, quicker, peppier – hey, let’s rename it “natpast”!

Bored sports talk-show hosts and their callers have been all over this topic for awhile, and major league baseball has been experimenting with time clocks and automatic intentional walks in an apparently-unsuccessful effort to appease them.

But you know an idea has truly jumped the shark when academics start weighing in.

Yesterday’s Wall Street Journal reported on a proposal by a computer scientist and an NYU game theorist called the Catch Up Rule, which stipulates that when the team at the plate takes a lead or already has one, they get just two outs in the inning instead of the usual three.

These scholars had their computers apply the rule to 100,000 games dating back half a century and found that the average margin of victory was cut by almost a third while games ran almost 25 minutes shorter.

While we’re at it, why don’t we just do away with pitchers entirely and have batters hit off a tee, like they did when they were tots?

Think of the savings in salary and resin bags, and how much nicer the field will look without that big, ugly mound in the middle!

Please, bored fans and academics with too much time on your hands….stop.

There’s nothing wrong with baseball.

If the culture has become too scattered and jumpy to enjoy a three-hour game and appreciate the lazy, summer experience even if it’s a lopsided score, that’s the culture’s problem.

Leave baseball alone.

Or, excuse me, natpast.

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Keller @ Large

Keller @ Large

Jon Keller is a WBZ TV & Radio political analyst. Read more

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