Crews Race To Repair Seawall On Duxbury-Marshfield Line

Checking out Duxbury after the second Nor'easter in less than a week.

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DUXBURY (WBZ-AM) -- Despite facing the second nor'easter in two weeks, officials said there was no significant new damage to the seawall on the Duxbury-Marshfield line.

There's significant flooding in the Bay Avenue area, but it certainly isn't as bad as what was seen during last week's storm.

Since that first storm, crews have worked hard to shore up breaks in the seawall--and Duxbury Town Manager Renee Reed told WBZ NewsRadio 1030 those repairs overnight did the job.

He said it helped that the astronomical tides weren't as bad this time around.

"We're grateful for that, because it's given us a little bit of a break," he said. "Hopefully, by not having the same height of the tide, we can get a little bit more done."

While it could have been worse, there was still flooding in coastal areas of Marshfield and Duxbury.

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It could have been worse--but the area is already pretty heavily damaged, and Reed said crews will continue to work on temporary fixes to the seawall.

"It's actually been holding," Reed said. "We had crews working out there until about 8 p.m. last night, but it all seems to be holding up pretty well for a temporary fix."

Those crews returned shortly after the high tide came at 4 a.m.

Reed said crews have been putting a lot of armament stone in front of parts of the wall that had fallen into the ocean, as well as re-stabilizing spots that are still standing.

duxbury flooded street march 8 storm

Flooding at Gurnet Road and Bay Street in Duxbury Thursday morning. (Duxbury Police)

Bill Kelly, who lives on the Marshfield-Duxbury line, said the flooding was the worst he's ever seen.

"I've been here, off and on, for 70 years--actually my mother went into labor with me on that beach 75 years ago," he said. "But it's just been four straight days. Normally a nor'easter comes in and it blows out ... the place is a mess. This is America's biggest mud puddle."

He likened the situation to Groundhog Day.

"You wake up in the morning, you don't see any TV trucks down here for five years--and then you wake up and there's seven of them every morning!"

WBZ NewsRadio 1030's Carl Stevens reports



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